What makes a monster? In this virtual series, we’ve selected 4 titles that explore monstrosity in various aesthetic forms: the silent horror of Nosferatu (1922), the B-Movie excess of Clive Barker’s Rawhead Rex (1986), the sensuous experimentation of Bill Gunn’s Ganja & Hess (1973), and the contemporary feminist vampire classic A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014). Don’t miss these films–they’re only available in our virtual cinema from 10/23 – 11/1!

 

Rent individual titles for $8 or rent the entire series for $20.

 watch now 

Nosferatu (1922)

Runtime: 94 minutes. Not rated.

A cornerstone of the horror film, F.W. Murnau’s NOSFERATU: A SYMPHONY OF HORROR is resurrected in an HD edition mastered from the acclaimed 35mm restoration by the Friedrich-Wilhelm-Murnau-Stiftung. Backed by an orchestral performance of Hans Erdmann’s 1922 score, this edition offers unprecedented visual clarity and historical faithfulness to the original release version.

An unauthorized adaptation of Bram Stoker’s Dracula, NOSFERATU remains to many viewers the most unsettling vampire film ever made, and its bald, spidery vampire, personified by the diabolical Max Schreck, continues to spawn imitations in the realm of contemporary cinema.

 watch trailer

Rawhead Rex (1986)

Runtime: 89 minutes. Rated R.

NEW 4K RESTORATION! He’s pure evil… pure power… pure terror! RawHead Rex is a demon, alive for millennia, trapped in the depths of hell, and waiting for release. He is held by an ancient seal, imprisoned for centuries in a barren field near the hamlet of Rathmore, Ireland. In time, this gruesome legacy has been forgotten, dismissed as an odd pre-Christian myth until Tom Garron (Donal McCann, December Bride) decides to plow the field his ancestors knew better than to disturb. The seal is broken and an unspeakable evil is unleashed – on a rampage of blood and lust. Howard Hallenbeck (David Dukes, Gods and Monsters), an American historian on a working vacation with his family, discovers on the stained glass windows of a local church a series of scenes illustrating the reign of terror of RawHead Rex, but the one piece of glass depicting the defeat of the monster is missing. RawHead Rex is on the loose, and he is insatiable as Howard is desperately races against time for a way to stop the vicious monster. Directed by George Pavlou (Transmutations) with a screenplay by horror legend Clive Barker (Hellraiser, Candyman, Nightbreed, Lord of Illusions).

 watch trailer

 

Ganja & Hess (1973)

Runtime: 113 minutes. Rated R.

Flirting with the conventions of blaxploitation and horror, Bill Gunn’s revolutionary independent film Ganja & Hess is a highly stylized and utterly original treatise on sex, religion, and African American identity. Duane Jones (Night of the Living Dead) stars as anthropologist Hess Green, who is stabbed with an ancient ceremonial dagger by his unstable assistant (director Bill Gunn), bestowing upon him the blessing of immortality… and the curse of an unquenchable thirst for blood. When the assistant’s beautiful and outspoken wife Ganja (Marlene Clark) comes searching for her missing husband, she and Hess form an unexpected partnership. Together, they explore just how much power blood holds.

Later recut and released in an inferior version (titled Blood Couple) this edition represents the original release, restored by The Museum of Modern Art with support from The Film Foundation, and mastered in HD from a 35mm negative.

 watch trailer

A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night (2014)

Runtime: 99 minutes. Not rated.

Strange things are afoot in Bad City. The Iranian ghost town, home to prostitutes, junkies, pimps, and other sordid souls, is a place that reeks of death and hopelessness, where a lonely vampire is stalking the towns most unsavory inhabitants. But when boy meets girl, an unusual love story begins to blossom…blood red.

The first Iranian Vampire Western, Ana Lily Amirpour’s debut feature A Girl Walks Home Alone at Night basks in the sheer pleasure of pulp. A joyful mash-up of genre, archetype and iconography, its prolific influences span spaghetti westerns, graphic novels, horror films, and the Iranian New Wave. Amped by a mix of Iranian rock, techno and Morricone-inspired riffs, its airy, anamorphic, black-and-white aesthetic and artfully drawn-out scenes combine the simmering tension of Sergio Leone with the surrealism of David Lynch.

 watch trailer